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CONWAY-KITTRICK/KETTERICK FAMILY

MR. CONWAY ( MacConnmhaigh), my great-great-grandfather, farmed a 1,000 acre farm in Letterkeen near Shramore, Burrisholle, County Mayo, Ireland. He had four sons that we know of: James (Jamsie), Michael, Patrick, and perhaps Walter. He died on his way to the fair of Balla, when Jamesie was about 16 years old. His wife later married a Mr. Kilroy

JAMES (JAMSIE) CONWAY (Seamus MacConnmhaigh, my great-grandfather, was from Letterkeen, a townland located next to the townland of Shramore, in the civil parish of Burrishoole, County Mayo, Ireland. He married Bridget McMenamon (Brid), Their children were: Catherine, my grandmother, Walter, James, Patrick, Mary (Moira) and another daughter. Our great-grandmother, Bridget, kept a small shop in the front of her house on Georges Street. Our grandfather, Jamsie, went to Canada with his brothers, Michael and, Patrick. Our great-grandfather, Jamsie, was a rebel and had to flee to Canada. Our great-grandmother, Bridget would not go and stayed in Newport with their children. The brothers settled in Swift Current, Saskatchewan, Canada, and became farmers. JAMES (JAMSIE) came back to Newport and died in Ireland.

PATRICK CONWAY (Padraig MacConnmhaigh), the brother of our great-grandfather, served in the Connaught Rangers during the South African Boer War. Later, he was stationed in Castlebar. Later he fled to Canada with his brothers, James (Jamsie) and Michael. He never married. He moved to Green Valley, California, where he lived until he died.

MICHAEL CONWAY (Micheal McConnmhaigh), the brother of our great-grandfather, was married in Ireland. His wife and daughter went with him to Canada. His, daughter, Mary, used to write to my father. I have two of her letters. One of her letters is dated January 24, 1914. She said it was 35 degrees below zero. Her address at that time was 937 Railway Street, Swift Current. Michael moved to Vancouver, British Colombia, Canada, and died there.

CATHERINE CONWAY KETTERICK (Catraoine Mac Connmhaigh), daughter of James (Jamsie) and

Bridget MacMenamon) Conway. Our grandmother was born in 1874 and grew up in the house on Georges Street, in the town of Newport, in the Civil Parish of Burrisholle, County Mayo, Ireland. She married James Kittrick of the Townland of Half Mile, Civil Parish of Kilmeena, County Mayo on May 9, 1899. Our grandparents had six children and continued to live in the house on Georges Street. In 1950, when we visited her, her health was beginning to fail. Later, as her old house needed so many repairs, she moved to Rose Cottage, Quay Road, Newport, and her old home on Georges Street was torn down.. She died in May or June of 1961,

WALTER CONWAY (Ualtar MacConnmhaigh), brother of our grandmother, CATHERINE CONWAY KETTERICK, moved to Crosshaven, County Cork, Ireland.

JAMES CONWAY (Seamus MacConnmhaigh), was the brother of our grandmother, Catherine Conway Ketterick He married BRIDGET GINLEY, of Bunahowna, Mulranney, County Mayo. They moved to Limerick City.

PATRICK CONWAY (Padraig MacConnmhaigh), brother of our grandmother, Catherine Conway Ketterick. He went to London,. My father said he stayed in England.

DAUGHTER CONWAY - MRS. MC NALLY (Mrs. Mac an Fhailghigh), our Grandmother's sister, was a nurse. She took care of the injured soldiers in World War I. She married a Captain McNally, from England. Captain McNally was in the Royal Engineers, and died in the fighting in France during World War I. She had no children. She was gassed during the war. After the war she lived in Manchester, England. She offered to bring my father over to England when he was in his teens and send him to school but my father did not want to go back to school. He admitted that he was sorry he didn't take the opportunity to go to school in England.

MARY (MOIRA) CONWAY (Moira MacConnmhaigh),. Her nickname was Moira Mack. She married Mr. McManamon. .Moira lived in the house next to our grandparents on Georges Street. Moira's five children were: MARY KATE(MAE), EMILY, TOM, CELIA, and her youngest daughter (Sheila?). She died February 4, 1943, the same year as our grandfather.

 

JAMES KITTRICK/KETTERICK (Seamus Mac Shitric),. Our grandfather was born circa 1872, the son of Patrick and Bridget Kittrick, and grew up on his father's farm in the the Townland of Half Mile, in the Civil Parish of Kilmeena, County Mayo, Ireland. The farm was located on the road between Westport and Newport, about four miles outside of Newport. His father, Patrick, and his mother, Bridget, had four children: Patrick, James, Michael and Mary(Kelly). He married Catherine Conway, of Georges Street, Newport, County Mayo, Ireland on May 9, 1899. They had six children: Mary Bridget ,Patrick James ,(James), Catherine Kathleen), Michael Walter (Mikey), John Joseph, and Celena. He and his two brothers moved into Newport. After he married, the priest sent the marriage certificate to Dublin to be registered. The clerk copied the name Kittrick as Ketterick. Our grandfather was told that Ketterick was now his legal name and if he wanted the name changed back to Kittrick, he would have to hire a lawyer to do that for him. Since he had no money for a lawyer he left the name as Ketterick. He continued to use the name Kittrick, but he was told for any legal documents he would have to use Ketterick. My father told me that his fraternal grandfather told him that his grandfather had told him that at one time many generations ago their ancestors had come to Ireland from Scotland. Our grandfather served an apprenticeship to become a baker. Eventually he opened his own bakery. The first bakery was located behind the home on Georges Street. The old house and bakery were later torn down and government offices were built at that location. I saw the second bakery in 1950 when new baking shelves were installed and was very impressed. Our uncle, John, ran the bakery at that time. He had a van and a helper who delivered the freshly baked even to some nearby islands. Our cousin, Vincent Ketterick, tells me the bakery has been torn down, and now there is a gas station at that location. Our grandfather was also the postmaster for the town of Newport. Once a year, our grandfather would travel to Wishaw, Scotland to work in the steel-mills there. He died on a Monday night, at 9:00 p.m., September 6, 1943 of heart failure.

In the 1901 Census of Ireland, James Kettrick, age 28, his wife, Kate, age 20, and their daughter, Mary, age 1, are shown living at 23 Georges Street, Newport. James's occupation is listed as baker.

My father, James, went to England when he was 15 years old. At first he worked in a shipyard. Later he joined the Connaught Rangers when the Armistice was announced. However he told me the fighting in Upper Silicia where he was sent continued unabated. After the Connaught Rangers were disbanded he came home to Newport. Next he came to Chicago where he met my mother, Mary O'Sullivan, from Castleisland, County Kerry, I have a brother. Later my parents adopted my sister from an orphanage in Co. Kerry.

Upper Silicia where he was sent continued unabated. After the Connaught Rangers were disbanded he came home to Newport. Next he came to Chicago where he met my mother, Mary O'Sullivan, from Castleisland, County Kerry, I have a brother. Later my parents adopted my sister from an orphanage in Co. Kerry.

Notes of Kathleen Ketterick Morrone, from stories my father, James Ketterick, , told me me and information from my cousins, Sister Maura McGuire, Sister Evelyn McGuire, Vincent Ketterick, Kathleen Kilroy Thomas, her son, Roy Thomas, and Peter Kilroy,